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.. vim: set fileencoding=utf-8 :
.. Copyright (c) 2016 Idiap Research Institute, http://www.idiap.ch/ ..
.. Contact: beat.support@idiap.ch ..
.. ..
.. This file is part of the beat.core module of the BEAT platform. ..
.. ..
.. Commercial License Usage ..
.. Licensees holding valid commercial BEAT licenses may use this file in ..
.. accordance with the terms contained in a written agreement between you ..
.. and Idiap. For further information contact tto@idiap.ch ..
.. ..
.. Alternatively, this file may be used under the terms of the GNU Affero ..
.. Public License version 3 as published by the Free Software and appearing ..
.. in the file LICENSE.AGPL included in the packaging of this file. ..
.. The BEAT platform is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but ..
.. WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY ..
.. or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. ..
.. ..
.. You should have received a copy of the GNU Affero Public License along ..
.. with the BEAT platform. If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/. ..
.. _beat-core-algorithms:
===========
Algorithms
===========
Algorithms are user-defined piece of software that run within the blocks of a
toolchain. An algorithm can read data on the input(s) of the block and write
processed data on its output(s). They are, hence, key components for
scientific experiments, since they formally describe how to transform raw
data into higher level concept such as classes.
An algorithm lies at the core of each processing block and may be subject to
parametrization. Inputs and outputs of an algorithm have well-defined data
formats. The format of the data on each input and output of the block is
defined at a higher-level in the platform. It is expected that the
implementation of the algorithm respects whatever was declared on the
platform.
By default, the algorithm is **data-driven**; algorithm is typically provided
one data sample at a time and must immediately produce some output data.
Furthermore, the way the algorithm handle the data is highly configurable and
covers a huge range of possible scenarios.
:numref:`beat-core-overview-block` displays the relationship between a
processing block and its algorithm.
.. _beat-core-overview-block:
.. figure:: ./img/block.*
Relationship between a processing block and its algorithm
This section contains information on the definition of algorithm and
its programmatic use on Python-based language bindings.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-definition:
Definition
----------
An algorithm is defined by two distinct components:
* a `JSON`_ object with several fields, specifying the inputs, the outputs,
the parameters and additional information such as the language in which it
is implemented.
* source code (and/or [later] binary code) describing how to transform the input
data.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-definition-json:
JSON Declaration
................
A `JSON`_ declaration of an algorithm consists of several fields. For example,
the following declaration is the one of an algorithm implementing
probabilistic component analysis (PCA):
.. code-block:: javascript
{
"language": "python",
"splittable": false,
"groups": [
{
"inputs": {
"image": {
"type": "system/array_2d_uint8/1"
}
},
"outputs": {
"subspace": {
"type": "tutorial/linear_machine/1"
}
}
}
],
"parameters": {
"number-of-components": {
"default": 5,
"type": "uint32"
}
},
"description": "Principal Component Analysis (PCA)"
}
The field `language` specifies the language in which the algorithm is
implemented. The field `splittable` indicates, whether the algorithm can be
parallelized into chunks or not. The field `parameters` lists the parameters
of the algorithm, describing both default values and their types. The field
`groups` gives information about the inputs and outputs of the algorithm.
They are provided into a list of dictionary, each element in this list being
associated to a database `channel`. The group, which contains outputs, is
the **synchronization channel**. By default, a loop is automatically performs
by the platform on the synchronization channel, and user-code must not loop
on this group. In contrast, it is the responsability of the user to load data
from the other groups. This is described in more details in the following
subsections. Finally, the field `description` is optional and gives a short
description of the algorithm.
The web client of the BEAT platform provides a graphical editor for algorithm,
which simplifies its `JSON`_ declaration definition.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-definition-analyzer:
Analyzer
........
At the end of the processing workflow of an experiment, there is a special
kind of algorithm, which does not yield any output, but in contrast so called
`results`. These algorithms are called **analyzers**.
`Results` of an experiment are reported back to the user. Since the platform
is concerned about data privacy, only a limited number of data formats can be
employed as results in an analyzer, such as boolean, integers, floating point
values, strings (of limited size), as well as plots (such as scatter or bar
plots).
For example, the following declaration is the one of a simple analyzer, which
generates an ROC curve as well as few other metrics.
.. code-block:: javascript
{
"language": "python",
"groups": [
{
"inputs": {
"scores": {
"type": "tutorial/probe_scores/1"
}
}
}
],
"results": {
"far": {
"type": "float32",
"display": true
},
"roc": {
"type": "plot/scatter/1",
"display": false
},
"number_of_positives": {
"type": "int32",
"display": false
},
"frr": {
"type": "float32",
"display": true
},
"eer": {
"type": "float32",
"display": true
},
"threshold": {
"type": "float32",
"display": false
},
"number_of_negatives": {
"type": "int32",
"display": false
}
}
}
.. _beat-core-algorithms-definition-code:
Source Code
...........
The BEAT platform has been designed to support algorithms written in different
programming languages. However, for each language, a corresponding back-end
needs to be implemented, which is in charge of connecting the inputs and
outputs to the algorithm and running its code as expected. In this section,
we describe the implementation of algorithms in the Python programming
language.
To implement a new algorithm, one must write a class following a few
conventions. In the following, examples of such classes are provided.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-examples:
Examples
--------
.. _beat-core-algorithms-examples-simple:
Simple algorithm (no parametrization)
.....................................
At the very minimum, an algorithm class must look like this:
.. code-block:: python
class Algorithm:
def process(self, inputs, outputs):
# Read data from inputs, compute something, and write the result
# of the computation on outputs
...
return True
The class must be called ``Algorithm`` and must have a method called
``process()``, that takes as parameters a list of inputs (see section
:ref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-inputlist`) and a list of outputs (see
section :ref:`beat-core-algorithms-output-outputlist`). This method must
return ``True`` if everything went correctly, and ``False`` if an error
occurred.
The platform will call this method once per block of data available on the
`synchronized` inputs of the block.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-examples-parametrizable:
Parametrizable algorithm
........................
To implement a parametrizable algorithm, two things must be added to the class:
(1) a field in the JSON declaration of the algorithm containing their default
values as well as the type of the parameters, and (2) a method called
``setup()``, that takes one argument, a map containing the parameters of the
algorithm.
.. code-block:: javascript
{
...
"parameters": {
"threshold": {
"default": 0.5,
"type": "float32"
}
},
...
}
.. code-block:: python
class Algorithm:
def setup(self, parameters):
# Retrieve the value of the parameters
self.threshold = parameters['threshold']
return True
def process(self, inputs, outputs):
# Read data from inputs, compute something, and write the result
# of the computation on outputs
...
return True
When retrieving the value of the parameters, one must not assume that a value
was provided for each parameter. This is why we may use a *try: ... except: ...*
construct in the ``setup()`` method.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input:
Handling input data
-------------------
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-inputlist:
Input list
..........
An algorithm is given access to the **list of the inputs** of the processing
block. This list can be used to access each input individually, either by
their name (see section :ref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-name`), their index
or by iterating over the list:
.. code-block:: python
# 'inputs' is the list of inputs of the processing block
print(inputs['labels'].data_format)
for index in range(0, inputs.length):
print(inputs[index].data_format)
for input in inputs:
print(input.data_format)
for input in inputs[0:2]:
print(input.data_format)
Additionally, the following method is useable on a **list of inputs**:
.. py:method:: hasMoreData()
Indicates if there is (at least) another block of data to process on some of
the inputs
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-input:
Input
.....
Each input provides the following informations:
.. py:attribute:: name
*(string)* Name of the input
.. py:attribute:: data_format
*(string)* Data format accepted by the input
.. py:attribute:: data_index
*(integer)* Index of the last block of data received on the input (See section
:ref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization`)
.. py:attribute:: data
*(object)* The last block of data received on the input
The structure of the ``data`` object is dependent of the data format assigned to
the input. Note that ``data`` can be *None*.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-name:
Input naming
............
Each algorithm assign a name of its choice to each input (and output, see
section :ref:`beat-core-algorithms-output-name`). This mechanism ensures that algorithms
are easily shareable between users.
For instance, in :numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-naming`, two different users
(Joe and Bill) are using two different toolchains. Both toolchains have one
block with two entries and one output, with a similar set of data formats
(*image/rgb* and *label* on the inputs, *array/float* on the output), although
not in the same order. The two blocks use different algorithms, which both
refers to their inputs and outputs using names of their choice
Nevertheless, Joe can choose to use Bill's algorithm instead of his own one.
When the algorithm to use is changed on the web interface, the platform will
attempt to match each input with the names (and types) declared by the
algorithm. In case of ambiguity, the user will be asked to manually resolve it.
In other words: the way the block is connected in the toolchain doesn't force a
naming scheme or a specific order of inputs to the algorithms used in that
block. As long as the set of data types (on the inputs and outputs) is
compatible for both the block and the algorithm, the algorithm can be used in
the block.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-naming:
.. figure:: ./img/inputs-naming.*
Different toolchains, but interchangeable algorithms
The name of the inputs are assigned in the JSON declaration of the algorithm,
such as:
.. code-block:: javascript
{
...
"groups": [
{
"inputs": {
"name1": {
"type": "data_format_1"
},
"name2": {
"type": "data_format_2"
}
}
}
],
...
}
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization:
Inputs synchronization
......................
The data available on the different inputs from the synchronized channels
are (of course) synchronized. Let's consider the example toolchain on
:numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization-example`, where:
* The image database provides two kind of data: some *images* and their
associated *labels*
* The *block A* receives both data via its inputs
* The *block B* only receives the *labels*
* Both algorithms are *data-driven*
The system will ask the *block A* to process 6 images, one by one. On the
second input, the algorithm will find the correct label for the current image.
The ``block B`` will only be asked to process 2 labels.
The algorithm can retrieve the index of the current block of data of each of
its input by looking at their ``data_index`` attribute. For simplicity, the
list of inputs has two attributes (``current_data_index`` and
``current_end_data_index``) that indicates the data indexes currently used by
the synchronization mechanism of the platform.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization-example:
.. figure:: ./img/inputs-synchronization.*
:width: 80%
Synchronization example
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-unsynchronized:
Additional input methods for unsynchronized channels
....................................................
Unsynchronized input channels of algorithms can be accessed at will, and
algorithms can use it any way they want. To be able to perform their job, they
have access to additional methods.
The following method is useable on a **list of inputs**:
.. py:method:: next()
Retrieve the next block of data on all the inputs **in a synchronized
manner**
Let's come back at the example toolchain on
:numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization-example`, and assume
that *block A* uses an autonomous algorithm. To iterate over all the data on
its inputs, the algorithm would do:
.. code-block:: python
class Algorithm:
def process(self, inputs, outputs):
# Iterate over all the unsynchronized data
while inputs.hasMoreData():
inputs.next()
# Do something with inputs['images'].data and inputs['labels'].data
...
# At this point, there is no more data available on inputs['images'] and
# inputs['labels']
return True
The following methods are useable on an ``input``, in cases where the algorithm
doesn't care about the synchronization of some of its inputs:
.. py:method:: hasMoreData()
Indicates if there is (at least) another block of data available on the input
.. py:method:: next()
Retrieve the next block of data
.. warning::
Once this method has been called by an algorithm, the input is no more
automatically synchronized with the other inputs of the block.
In the following example, the algorithm desynchronizes one of its inputs but
keeps the others synchronized and iterate over all their data:
.. code-block:: javascript
{
...
"groups": [
{
"inputs": {
"images": {
"type": "image/rgb"
},
"labels": {
"type": "label"
},
"desynchronized": {
"type": "number"
}
}
}
],
...
}
.. code-block:: python
class Algorithm:
def process(self, inputs, outputs):
# Desynchronize the third input. From now on, inputs['desynchronized'].data
# and inputs['desynchronized'].data_index won't change
inputs['desynchronized'].next()
# Iterate over all the data on the inputs still synchronized
while inputs.hasMoreData():
inputs.next()
# Do something with inputs['images'].data and inputs['labels'].data
...
# At this point, there is no more data available on inputs['images'] and
# inputs['labels'], but there might be more on inputs['desynchronized']
return True
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-feedbackloop:
Feedback inputs
...............
The :numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-feedbackloop-example` shows a toolchain
containing a feedback loop. A special kind of input is needed in this scenario:
a *feedback input*, that isn't synchronized with the other inputs, and can be
freely used by the algorithm.
Those feedback inputs aren't yet implemented in the prototype of the platform.
This will be addressed in a later version.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-input-feedbackloop-example:
.. figure:: ./img/feedback-loop.*
Feedback loop
.. _beat-core-algorithms-output:
Handling output data
--------------------
.. _beat-core-algorithms-output-outputlist:
Output list
...........
An algorithm is given access to the **list of the outputs** of the processing
block. This list can be used to access each output individually, either by
their name (see section :ref:`beat-core-algorithms-output-name`), their index
or by iterating over the list:
.. code-block:: python
# 'outputs' is the list of outputs of the processing block
print outputs['features'].data_format
for index in range(0, outputs.length):
outputs[index].write(...)
for output in outputs:
output.write(...)
for output in outputs[0:2]:
output.write(...)
.. _beat-core-algorithms-output-output:
Output
......
Each output provides the following informations:
.. py:attribute:: name
*(string)* Name of the output
.. py:attribute:: data_format
*(string)* Format of the data written on the output
And the following methods:
.. py:method:: createData()
Retrieve an initialized block of data corresponding to the data format of
the output
.. py:method:: write(data, end_data_index=None)
Write a block of data on the output
We'll look at the usage of those methods through some examples in the following
sections.
.. _beat-core-algorithms-output-name:
Output naming
.............
Like for its inputs, each algorithm assign a name of its choice to each output
(see section :ref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-name` for more details) by
including them in the JSON declaration of the algorithm.
.. code-block:: javascript
{
...
"groups": [
{
"inputs": {
...
},
"outputs": {
"name1": {
"type": "data_format1"
},
"name2": {
"type": "data_format2"
}
}
}
],
...
}
.. _beat-core-algorithms-output-example1: