Commit 19b23df1 authored by André Anjos's avatar André Anjos 💬

[doc] Fix figure number references

parent 957e947f
Pipeline #1933 passed with stage
......@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@ one data sample at a time and must immediately produce some output data.
Furthermore, the way the algorithm handle the data is highly configurable and
covers a huge range of possible scenarios.
:num:`Figure #beat-core-overview-block` displays the relationship between a
:numref:`beat-core-overview-block` displays the relationship between a
processing block and its algorithm.
.. _beat-core-overview-block:
......@@ -356,7 +356,7 @@ Each algorithm assign a name of its choice to each input (and output, see
section :ref:`beat-core-algorithms-output-name`). This mechanism ensures that algorithms
are easily shareable between users.
For instance, in :num:`figure #beat-core-algorithms-input-naming`, two different users
For instance, in :numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-naming`, two different users
(Joe and Bill) are using two different toolchains. Both toolchains have one
block with two entries and one output, with a similar set of data formats
(*image/rgb* and *label* on the inputs, *array/float* on the output), although
......@@ -409,7 +409,7 @@ Inputs synchronization
The data available on the different inputs from the synchronized channels
are (of course) synchronized. Let's consider the example toolchain on
:num:`figure #beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization-example`, where:
:numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization-example`, where:
* The image database provides two kind of data: some *images* and their
associated *labels*
......@@ -452,7 +452,7 @@ The following method is useable on a **list of inputs**:
Let's come back at the example toolchain on
:num:`figure #beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization-example`, and assume
:numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-synchronization-example`, and assume
that *block A* uses an autonomous algorithm. To iterate over all the data on
its inputs, the algorithm would do:
......@@ -545,7 +545,7 @@ keeps the others synchronized and iterate over all their data:
Feedback inputs
...............
The :num:`figure #beat-core-algorithms-input-feedbackloop-example` shows a toolchain
The :numref:`beat-core-algorithms-input-feedbackloop-example` shows a toolchain
containing a feedback loop. A special kind of input is needed in this scenario:
a *feedback input*, that isn't synchronized with the other inputs, and can be
freely used by the algorithm.
......@@ -665,10 +665,10 @@ Example 1: Write one block of data for each received block of data
Example 1: 6 images as input, 6 blocks of data produced
Consider the example toolchain on :num:`figure
#beat-core-algorithms-output-example1-figure`. We will implement a
*data-driven* algorithm that will write one block of data on the output of
the block for each image received on its inputs. This is the simplest case.
Consider the example toolchain on
:numref:`beat-core-algorithms-output-example1-figure`. We will implement a
*data-driven* algorithm that will write one block of data on the output of the
block for each image received on its inputs. This is the simplest case.
.. code-block:: javascript
......@@ -729,10 +729,11 @@ Example 2: Skip some blocks of data
Example 2: 6 images as input, 4 blocks of data produced, 2 blocks of data
skipped
Consider the example toolchain on :num:`figure
#beat-core-algorithms-output-example2-figure`. This time, our algorithm will use a
criterion to decide if it can perform its computation on an image or not, and
tell the platform that, for a particular data index, no data is available.
Consider the example toolchain on
:numref:`beat-core-algorithms-output-example2-figure`. This time, our algorithm
will use a criterion to decide if it can perform its computation on an image or
not, and tell the platform that, for a particular data index, no data is
available.
.. code-block:: javascript
......@@ -798,10 +799,10 @@ Example 3: Write one block of data related to several received blocks of data
Example 3: 6 images as input, 2 blocks of data produced
Consider the example toolchain on :num:`figure
#beat-core-algorithms-output-example3-figure`. This time, our algorithm will compute
something using all the images with the same label (all the dogs, all the cats)
and write only one block of data related to all those images.
Consider the example toolchain on
:numref:`beat-core-algorithms-output-example3-figure`. This time, our algorithm
will compute something using all the images with the same label (all the dogs,
all the cats) and write only one block of data related to all those images.
The key here is the correct usage of the **current end data index** of the
input list to specify the indexes of the blocks of data we write on the output.
......
......@@ -47,7 +47,6 @@ extensions = [
'sphinx.ext.todo',
'sphinx.ext.coverage',
'sphinx.ext.pngmath',
'sphinx.ext.ifconfig',
'sphinx.ext.autodoc',
'sphinx.ext.autosummary',
......@@ -59,6 +58,12 @@ extensions = [
'sphinxcontrib.mscgen',
]
import sphinx
if sphinx.__version__ >= "1.4.1":
extensions.append('sphinx.ext.imgmath')
else:
extensions.append('sphinx.ext.pngmath')
# Always includes todos
todo_include_todos = True
......
......@@ -316,8 +316,8 @@ Putting it all together: a complete example
A complete toolchain that train and test an Eigenfaces system
The following example describes the toolchain visible at :num:`figure
#beat-core-toolchains-example-figure`, a complete toolchain that:
The following example describes the toolchain visible at
:numref:`beat-core-toolchains-example-figure`, a complete toolchain that:
#. train an Eigenfaces face recognition system on one set of images (*train*)
#. enroll client-specific models on another set of images (*templates*)
......
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